1719

 

 

Jan 1

[Thomas Tudway to Humfrey Wanley, 1 January 1718/9]

 

[...] My sixth, & last volume,

is now at a stand, & must wait for Copies, from severall places,

& particularly, those promis’d me from Dr Arbuthnot, & Oxford

wch my Noble Lord has promis’d to procure me; I am desirous

this last volume, should be as comprehensive as possible, &

take in all liveing Authors, as well as such, who have dy’d since

the work was begun; [...]

 

 

 

Jan 26 (Feb 6 NS)

Willers’ Theatrical Notes, Hamburg

 

Feb. 6. Oriana.

 

 

 

Jan 31

[Thomas Pelham-Holles, Duke of Newcastle, to

Nicholas Lechmere, Attorney General]

 

Cockpit. the 31st January 1718/9

Sir

The inclos’d petition of Severall Gentlemen who desire

to be incorporated by Letters patents for the Encouragment

of Musick. having been presented to his Majesty

His Majesty has commanded me to referr the Same to

you, for Your Advice & Opinion how far it may be fitt for

him to grant the Same which I desire you will transmitt to

me as soon as you can conveniently to be laid before his

Majesty for his further pleasure. I am Sir

Your most Obedient humble Servant

Holles Newcastle

To the Right honourable Mr. Lechmere

 

 

 

Feb 3

[Diary of the Reverend Dr Henry Brydges]

 

Tuesday February 3

[... 32r ...] I supt at Col. Jacob’s

where ye same company that din’d at my Mothers

(except The. Leigh) met at Seven, Sr. Hungerford & Lady

Hoskyns, H. Walcot, Mr. Baxter, Dr. Pepuis, Mrs. Margarita

and Mrs. Pullman join’d us & spent ye Evening with us.

 

 

 

Feb 9

[Jonathan Swift to Robert Harley]

 

[“1719, Feb. 9. Dublin.”]

 

Sir, I was twice disappointed with your letter. When I saw your

name on the outside I thought it had been a civility you had done to

some friend to save me postage; when I saw the same name after

opening I was in hopes to hear something of you and your family, my

Lord Oxford, Lord Harley, and your son, and I wish you had sayd

something on that head by way of postscript. I desire you will ask

my Lord Oxford whether his brother Nathaniel understands musick;

if he does, and recommends Mr. Lovelace particularly from his own

knowledge, something may be said. I have the honour to be Captain

of a band of nineteen musicians (including boys), which are I hear

about five less then my friend the D. of Chandos, and I understand

musick like a Muscovite; but my quire is so degenerate under the

reigns of former Deans of famous memory, that the race of people

called Gentlemen Lovers of Musick tell me I must be very carefull in

supplying two vacancyes, which I have been two years endeavoring to

do. For you are to understand that in disposing these musicall employments,

I determine to act directly contrary to Ministers of State, by

giving them to those who best deserve. If you had recommended a

person to me for a Church-living in my gift, I would be less curious;

because an indifferent Parson may do well enough, if he be honest, but

Singers like their brothers the Poets must be very good, or they are

good for nothing. I wish my Lord Oxford had writ to me on this

subject, that I might have had the pleasure of refusing him in direct

terms.

If you will order Mr. Lovelace to enquire for one Rosingrave my

organist now in London, and approve his skill to him, on his report I

shall be ready lo accept Lovelace, which is the short of the matter that

I have made so many words of, in revenge for your saying nothing of

what I would desire to know; and I must desire you to put my Lord

Oxford in mind of sending me his picture, for it is just eight years last

Tuesday since he promised me. If you had said but one syllable of my

sister Harriette I could have pardoned you.

[...]

 

 

 

Feb 17

[Wells, 17 February 1719]

 

I was at our Musick-Meeting where we had the first tryal of Hendel’s Pastoral [?Acis and Galatea].

 

 

 

Feb 18

For the Benefit of Mr. Leneker, and Mrs. Smith.

AT Mr. Hickford’s Great Room in James-street near the Hay-market, this present Wednesday, being the 18th Day of February, will be perform’d, a Consort of Vocal and Instrumental Musick, by the best Hands. A new Concerto, Compos’d by Mr. Hendel, and perform’d by Mr. Mathew Dubourg. And a Piece for the Harpsicord by Mr. Cook. A Concerto and a Solo by Mr. Kytch. A Solo for the Bass-Viol, and German Flute by Signor Pietro. Tickets may be had at the Coco-Tree Chocolate House in Pall-Mall, and at the Place of Performance, at 5 s. each. To begin exactly at 7 a-Clock.

 

 

 

Feb 20

Handel to his brother-in-law Michael Dietrich Michaelsen

Monsieur

mon tres Honoré Frere,

Ne jugez pas, je Vous supplie, de mon envie de Vous voir par le retardement de mon depart, c’est à mon grand regret que je me vois arreté icy par des affaires indispensables et d’ou, j’ose dire, ma fortune depend, et les quelles ont trainé plus longtems que je n’avois crû. Si Vous scaviez la peine que j’eprouve, de ce que je n’ai pas pu mettre en execution ce que je desire si ardement Vous auriez de l’indulgence pour moy. mais a la fin j’espere d’en venir à bout dans un mois d’icy, et Vous pouvez conter que je ne ferai aucun delay, et que je me mettrai incessamment en chemin, Je Vous supplie, Mon tres Cher Frere d’en assurer la Mama et de mon obeissance, et faites moy surtout part encore une fois de Vôtre Etat, de celuy de la Marna, et de Vôtre Chere Famille, pour diminuer l’inquietude et l’impatience dans la quelle je me trouve, Vous jugez bien, Mon tres Cher Frere, que je serois inconsolable, si je n’avois pas l’esperance de me dedommager bientôt de ce delay, en restant d’autant plus longtems avec Vous.

            Je suis etonné de ce que le Marchand a Magdebourg n’a pas encore satisfait à la lettre de Change, je Vous prie de la garder seulement, et à mon arrivée elle sera ajustée. J’ay recus avis que l’Etain serà bientôt achemine pour Vos endroits, je suis honteux de ce retardement aussi bien que de ce que je n’ai pas pu m’acquitter plus tôt de ma promesse, je Vous supplie de l’excuser et de croire que malgré tous mes effors il m’a été impossible de reussir, Vous en conviendrez Vous méme lorsque j’aurai l’honneur de Vous le dire de bouche. Vous ne devez pas douter que je ne haterai mon voyage: je languis plus que Vous ne scauriez Vous imaginer de Vous voir. Je Vous remercie tres humblement des voeux que Vous m’avez addresses à l’occasion du nouvel’an. Je souhaite de mon côté, que le Toutpuissant veuille Vous combler et Vôtre Chere Famille de toutes sortes de Prosperites, et d’addoucir par ses pretieuses benedictions la playe sensible qu’il luy a plu de Vous faire essuyer, et qui m’a frappé egalement. Vous pouvez etre assuré que je conserverai toujours vivement le Souvenir des bontés que Vous avez eues par feue mà Soeur, et que les sentiments de mà reconnaissance dureront aussi longtems que mes jours. Ayez la bonté de faire bien mes Complimens à Mr. Rotth et a tous les bon Amis. Je Vous embrasse avec toute Votre Chere Famille, et je suis avec une passion inviolable toute ma vie

Monsieur

et tres Honoré Frere

Vôtre

tres humble et tres obeissant

Serviteur

George Frideric Handel.

à Londres

ce 20 des Fevrier 1719.

 

A Monsieur,

Monsieur Michael Dietrich Michaëlsen,

Docteur en Droit

à Halle

en Saxe.

Honoured Brother,

 

I beg that you will not judge of my eagerness to see you by the lateness of my departure; it is greatly to my regret that I find myself kept here by affairs of the greatest moment, on which (I venture to say) all my fortunes depend; but they have continued much longer than I had anticipated. If you knew my distress at not having been able to perform what I so ardently desire, you would be indulgent towards me; but I am hoping to conclude it all in a month from now, and you can rest assured that I shall then make no delay but set out forthwith. Pray, dearest brother, assure Mamma of this, as also of my duty; and inform me once again of the state of health of yourself, Mamma and all your family, so as to relieve my present anxiety and impatience. You will realise, dearest brother, that I should be inconsolable, did I not expect very soon to make up for this delay by remaining all the longer with you.

            I am astonished that the merchant at Magdeburg has not yet honoured the letter of exchange. Pray keep it and the matter will be put right when I come. I have been informed that the pewter will soon be despatched to your address; I am as ashamed at this delay as at my own inability to carry out my promise earlier. I beg you to excuse it and to believe that it was impossible for me to succeed, in spite of all my efforts. You will yourself agree when I have the honour of telling you about it in person. You must not doubt that I shall hasten on my journey. I am longing to see you more than you can imagine. I thank you most humbly for the good wishes that you sent me for the New Year. On my part I trust that the Almighty will shower on you and your beloved family every kind of good fortune and will heal through His precious blessings the painful wound which it has pleased Him to make you suffer, and which has pained me no less. You can be assured that I shall always keep the most lively memory of your goodness towards my late sister, and that my feelings of gratitude will endure all my days. Have the goodness to convey my compliments to Mr. Rotth and to all my good friends. I embrace you and all your dear family. I remain with steadfast devotion all my life,

Honoured Brother,

Your most humble and obedient servant,

George Frideric Handel.

London, February 20th, 1719.

 

To Mr. Michael Dietrich Michaëlsen,

Doctor of Law, Halle (Saxony).

 

 

 

 

Feb 21

Mr. Hendel, a famous Master of Musick, is gone beyond Sea, by Order of his Majesty, to Collect a Company of the choicest Singers in Europe, for the Opera in the Hay-Market.

 

 

 

Feb 24

Handel to Johann Mattheson

à Londres, Fev. 24, 1719.

Monsieur,

 

Par la Lettre que je viens de recevoir de votre part, datée du 21 du courant je me vois pressé si obligeamment de vous satisfaire plus particulierement, que je n’ai fait dans mes precedentes, sur les deux points en question, que je ne puis me dispenser de declarer, que mon opinion se trouve generalement conforme à ce que vous avez si bien deduit & prouvé dans votre livre touchant la Solmisation & les Modes Grecs. La question ce me semble reduit a ceci: Si l’on doit preferer une Methode aisée & des plus parfaites à une autre qui est accompagnée de grandes difficultés, capables non seulement de degouter les eleves dans la Musique, mais aussi de leur faire consumer un tems pretieux, qu’on peut employer beaucoup mieux à approfondir cet art & à cultiver son genie? Ce n’est pas que je veuille avancer, qu’on ne peut tirer aucune utilité de la Solmisation: mais comme on peut acquerir les mêmes connoissances en bien moins de tems par la methode dont on se sert à present avec tant de sucees, je ne vois pas, pourquoi on ne doive opter le chemin qui conduit plus facilement & en moins de tems au but qu’on se propose? Quant aux Modes Grecs, je trouve, Monsieur, que vous avez dit tout ce qui se peut dire là dessus. Leur connoissance est sans doute necessaire à ceux qui veulent pratiquer & executer la Musique ancienne, qui a été composée suivant ces Modes; mais comme on s’est affranchi des bornes etroites de l’ancienne Musique, je ne vois pas de quelle utilité les Modes Grecs puissant être pour la Musique moderne. Ce cont là, Monsieur, mes sentiments, vous m’obligerez de me faire sçavoir s’ils repondent à ce que vous souhaitez de moi.

            Pour ce qui est du second point, vouz pouvez juger vous même, qu’il demande beaucoup de recueillement, dont je ne suis pas le maitre parmi les occupations pressantes, que j’ai par devers moi. Dès que j’en serai un peu débarassé, je repasserai les Epoques principales que j’ai eues dans le cours de ma Profession, pour vous faire voir l’estime & la consideration particuliere avec laquelle j’ai l’honneur d’etre

Monsieur

votre tres humble & tres

obeissant serviteur

G. F. Handel.

London, February 24th, 1719.

Sir,

 

The letter that I have just received from you dated the 21st of this month obliges me with all haste to satisfy you more precisely than I had done in my previous letters on the two points in question. I must therefore declare that, in the matter of solmization and the Greek modes, my opinion conforms in general to what you have so ably deduced and proved in your book. The question, in my opinion, comes to this: whether one should [not] prefer a method at the same time simple and of the most perfect kind to another which is fraught with great difficulties, apt not only to give pupils a distaste for music but also to make them waste much precious time, which could be better employed in acquiring a profound knowledge of this art and in improving their natural gifts? I do not mean to argue that solmization is of no practical use whatever, but as one can acquire the same knowledge in far less time by the method in use at present with such success, I see no point in not adopting the way which leads with greater ease and in less time to the proposed goal. Touching the Greek modes, I find, Sir, that you have said all that there is to be said on that score. Knowledge of them is no doubt necessary for those who wish to study and execute ancient music composed according to these modes; but as we have [now] been liberated from the narrow limits of ancient music, I cannot see of what use the Greek modes can be to modern music. Such, Sir, are my views; you will oblige me by informing me if they agree with what you wish from me.

            As regards the second point, you can yourself judge that it demands more leisure than I can dispose of among the many pressing affairs that I have on hand. As soon as I am a little freer, I shall pass in review the main periods of my professional life, so that you may be assured of the particular esteem and consideration in which I have the honour to remain,

            Sir,

                        Your most humble and

                                    obedient servant,

                                                G. F. Handel.

 

 

 

Feb 27

[Nicholas Lechmere, Attorney General, to

Thomas Pelham-Holles, Duke of Newcastle]

 

To the Kings most Excellent Majesty

 

May It Please Your Majesty

In humble Obedience to your Majesties Commands,

Signify’d to me by his Grace of New Castle, Whereby the

Petition of severall Gentlemen, who desire to be

incorporated by Letters Patents for the Encouragement of

Musick, is referr’d to me for my Advice & Opinion, How

far it may be fit for Your Majesty to Grant the same. I

do most humbly Certify Your Majesty, That I have Considered

the said Position, which Setts forth, That severall Persons

of Quality & others, for the Encouragement of Musick,

& the most innocent entertainment that is afforded to the

Publick, by that noble Art, have agreed by a joint Stock

to exhibit Operas on the English Theatre, in greater

perfection then they have hitherto been represented,

either in this or any other Country, And that nothing of

this kind can be executed without Your Majesties Royal

permission, & that it is absolutely necessary, That such [312]

a Society be furnished with Powers of Acting as a Legal

& United Body, without which they cannot make Contracts,

purchase, sue or transact their Affairs, and therefor

they most humbly Pray That your Majesty, out of your

accustomed readiness to favour all excellent Arts, would

be Pleased to Incorporate the Petitioners by Letters

Patents under your Great Seal, with the Denomination &

Title of the Royal Academy of Musick, or any other that

your Majesty shall think fit to bestow, & with such

Powers Rules & Restrictions as Your Majesty, according

to your Royal Prerogative, & Royal Wisedome, shall think

proper; And I am most humbly of Opinion, That Your Majesty

may Legally grant your Letters Patents of Incorporation

to the Petitioners, or any others that your Majesty

shall think fit, for the purpose mention’d in the said

Petition, under what Title or Denomination you shall be

graciously pleas’d therein to appoint, So as, such Incorporation

be made, in such manner, & with such Powers only,

& under such Regulations & Restrictions, as shall be

consistent with Your Majesty’s Prerogative in that respect,

& the Rights of the Office of Your Majesty’s Lord Chamberlain

for that time being, & the Rights of Others of Your

Majesties Subjects, All which Considerations will come

under the care & judgment of Those, Through whose hands

such Letters Patents shall pass, In case Your Majesty shall

thank {sic} fit to Gratify Your Petitioners as they desire

All which is most humbly Submitted to

Your Majesty’s Royal Wisdom

N Lechmere

27 February 1718[/9]

 

 

 

Feb 28

By Command.

For the Benefit of Mrs. Robinson, late Mrs. Turner, who never sung but once before in publick.

AT the King’s Theatre in the Hay-Market, this present Saturday, being the 28th Day of February, will be performed a Concert of Musick, divided into three Parts, the second Part entirely new, compos’d by Signor Attilio Ariosti purposely on this Occasion. Boxes and Pit put together, and none to enter without Tickets, which will be deliver’d at the Theatre, this Day, at half a Guinea each, where Attendance will be given from 9 in the Morning till Night. Gallery 2 s. 6 d. To begin at 7 a Clock.

 

 

 

early 1719

Preface to the text of the Passion by Barthold Heinrich Brockes

Es ist nicht zu verwundern, daß die vier großen Musici, Herr Keiser, Herr Händel, Herr Telemann und Herr Mattheson, als welche sich, durch ihre viele und treffliche der musikalischen Welt gelieferte Meisterstücke, einen ewigen Ruhm erworben, solches in die Musik zu bringen, für ihr grössestes Vergnügen geschätzet, in welcher Verrichtung es ihnen denn so ungemein wohl gelungen, daß auch der behutsamste Kenner einer schönen Musik gestehen muß, er wisse nicht, was hier an Anmuth, Kunst und natürlicher Ausdrückung der Gemüths-Neigungen vergessen, und wem der Rang, ohne einem gefährlichen Urtheil sich zu unterwerffen, zu geben sey. Des Herrn Keisers Musik ist ehedessen schon unterschiedne mahl, mit der grössesten Approbation, aufgeführet worden. Des Herrn Matthesons dies Jahr zu zweien mahlen gehörte Musik hat den Zuhörern derselben ein unsterbliches Andenken seiner Virtù überlassen. Nun aber ist man Willens, künfftigen Montag (in der Stillen Woche) des Herrn Händels, und Dienstags des Herrn Telemanns Musik aufzuführen.

It is not to be wondered at that the four great musicians, Herr Keiser, Herr Händel, Herr Telemann and Herr Mattheson, who, through their many and admirable masterpieces, given to the world of music, earned for themselves eternal honour, esteemed as their greatest pleasure the setting of such [a Text] to music, in which achievement they succeeded so uncommonly well that even the most prudent connoisseur of beautiful music must confess that he knows of no grace, art and natural expression of feeling which have been forgotten here, and that, without committing himself to a hazardous judgement, he does not know to whom the highest rank is to be given. The music of Herr Keiser has been performed at different times before now with the greatest approbation. The music of Herr Mattheson, heard twice this year, has left with the hearer of it an undying memory of his Virtú. Now, however, it is intended that the music of Herr Händel shall be performed next Monday (in Passion week) and that of Herr Telemann next Tuesday.

 

 

 

Mar 21

By Command.

AT the King’s Theatre in the Hay-Market, this present Saturday, being the 21st Day of March, will be perform’d a Concert of Vocal and Instrumental Musick. The Vocal Part to be performed by Mrs. Robinson, late Mrs. Turner, and Sig. Benedetto Baldassari. Mrs. Robinson will sing the Cantata she sung in her own Concert, compos’d by Sig. Attilio Ariosti. The Concert will be perform’d in a Magnificent Triumphant Scene, exceeding 30 Foot in Length any Scene ever seen before. Painted by Sig. Roberto Clerici. The Pit and Boxes to be put together, and no Person to be admitted without Tickets; which will be delivered out at White’s Chocolate House in St. James’s-street, and at the Theatre, on Saturday next, at half a Guinea each. Gallery 2 s. 6 d.

 

 

 

Mar 31

Hamburger Relations-Courier

 

Künfftige Woche wird man ein vortreffliches geistliches Oratorium in dem Dom auff dem Reventher Nachmittag um 4 Uhr präcise und zwar Montags [3. April] des Hn. Capellmeisters Hendels Music dienstags aber des Capellmeisters Hrn. Telemanns Composition aufführen.

 

 

 

May 1

[John Hughes to Mary, Countess Cowper, May Day 1719]

 

Madam

Mrs Barbier’s Time being so very [356]

uncertain, I have engag’d another of my

Musical Acquaintance, Mrs Robinson, the

Daughter of Dr Turner, who will be proud

of the Opportunity of waiting on your

Ladyship tomorrow in the Evening. Her

late Improvement has I think plac’d her in

the first Rank of our English Performers.

Mr Robinson begs leave to send his own

Harpsichord, that of your Ladyship’s being,

as I remember, not exactly of the Consort

Pitch. I have likewise sent to Mr Hendel,

who if he is not engag’d will, I am sure, be

very glad of the Same Opportunity. I

wish it may be any way in my Power to

contribute to your Ladyship’s Entertainment

or Satisfaction, & am [Hunter: very] sorry it is only

in Trifles I can express the very great Sense

I have of Obligations which can never be

acknowledg’d as they ought by

Madam

Your Ladyship’s most

dutiful [Hunter: dutifull] & most obedient humble Servt

May-Day

1719

 

 

 

May 14

Warrant and Instructions by Thomas Holles, Duke of Newcastle

 

Warrant to Mr Hendel to procure Singers for the English Stage,

Whereas His Majesty has been graciously Pleas’d to Grant Letters Patents to the Severall Lords and Gent. mention’d in the Annext List for the Encouragement of Operas for and during the Space of Twenty one Years, and Likewise as a further encouragement has been graciously Pleas’d to Grant a Thousand Pounds p.A. for the Promotion of this design, And also that the Chamberlain of his Mats Household for the time being is to be always Governor of the said Company. I do by his Majestys Command Authorize and direct You forthwith to repair to Italy Germany or such other Place or Places as you shall think proper, there to make Contracts with such Singer or Singers as you shall judge fit to perform on the English Stage. And for so doing this shall be your Warrant Given under my hand and Seal this 14th day of May 1719 in the Fifth Year of his Mats Reign.

            To Mr Hendel Master

of Musick.…

Holles Newcastle.

 

Instructions to Mr Hendel.

            That Mr Hendel either by himself or such Correspondencs as he shall think fit procure proper Voices to Sing in the Opera.

            The said Mr Hendel is impower’d to contract in the Name of the Patentees with those Voices to Sing in the Opera for one Year and no more.

            That Mr Hendel engage Senezino as soon as possible to Serve the said Company and for as many Years as may be.

            That in case Mr Hendel meet with an excellent Voice of the first rate he is to Acquaint the Govr and Company forthwith of it and upon what Terms he or She may be had.

            That Mr Hendel from time to time Acquaint the Governor and Company with his proceedings, Send Copys of the Agreemts which he makes with these Singers and obey such further Instructions as the Governor and Company shall from time to time transmit unto him.

Holles Newcastle.

 

 

 

List of the 62 original subscribers to the Royal Academy of Music

 

Henry Duke of Kent, Thomas Holles Duke of Newcastle (1000), Charles Duke of Grafton, Henry Duke of Portland (600), Charles Duke of Manchester, James Duke of Chandois (1000), James Duke of Montrose, Charles Earl of Sunderland, Henry Earl of Rochester, James Earl of Berkeley, Richard Earl of Burlington (1000), George Henry Earl of Litchfield, Henry Earl of Lincoln, Henry Viscount Lonsdale, Thomas Earl of Strafford, William Earl Cadogan, Talbot Earl of Sussex, Henry Earl of Thomond, George Earl of Halifax, David Earl of Portmore, Count Bothmer, Allen Lord Bathurst, Robert Lord Bingley, George Lord Lansdowne, John Lord Gower, Henry Lord Carleton, Richard Lord Viscount Castlemayne (400), Charles Marquess of Winchester, James Lord Viscount Limerick, James Craggs, Esq; Walter Lord Viscount Chetwynd, Sir John Jennings, Sir Hungerd Hoskins, Sir Matthew Decker, William Evans, Roger Jones, James Bruce, William Pult(e)ney, Thomas Coke, Richard Hampden, Sir John Guise, Thomas Harrison, Benjamin Mildmay, George Harrison, George Wade, Thomas Coke, Esq; Vice Chamberlain, Francis Whitworth, William Chetwynd, Thomas Smith, Martin Bladen, Thomas Gage, Francis Negus, William Yonge, Bryan Fairfax, Kroynberg, Esq; John Arbuthnot, Esq; Sir George Coke, Sir Humphrey Howarth, Sir Wilfred Lawson, Henry Earl of Montroth [recte Mountrath], John Blith, William Lord North-Grey, Samuel Edwin.

 

 

 

May 22

Never Acted before.

AT the Theatre in Little Lincoln-Inn-Fields, this present Friday, being the 22d of May, will be presented, A Mock Opera, call’d, Harlequin-Hydaspes; or, The Greshamite. The Part of Harlequin by the Author, who mimicks the famous Nicolini in his whole Action, being the first Time of his Appearance upon the English Stage. Pit and Boxes to be laid together. N. B. Tickets are delivered at the Long Room at the Theatre in the Hay-Market, and at Slaughter’s Coffe-house in St. Martin’s-Lane. The Tickets given for Wednesday will be taken this Day.

 

 

 

May 25

Never Acted before, being unfortunately prevented on Friday last, by the unexpected Arrest of the Person who was to have played the Doctor.

By the Company of Comedians.

AT the Theatre in Little Lincoln’s-Inn-Fields, on Wednesday next, being the 27th of May, will be presented a Mock Opera, call’d, Harlequin-Hydaspes, or, The Greshamite. Harlequin by the Author Mr. Aubert, and that of the Doctor by Chr. Bullock. Pit and Boxes to be put together. Tickets are delivered at the long Room at the Haymarket Play-house, and at Slaughter’s Coffe-house in St. Martin’s-Lane.

 

 

 

May 27

Never Acted before.

AT the Theatre in Little Lincoln-Inn-Fields, this present Wednesday, being the 27th of May, will be presented a Mock Opera call’d Harlequin-Hydaspes, or the Greshamite. The Part of Harlequin by the Author Mr. Aubert, and that of the Doctor by Chr. Bullock. Pit and Boxes to be laid together. Tickets are delivered at the long Room at the Hay-Market Theatre, and at Slaughter’s Coffe-House in St. Martin’s-Lane. Note, Those given for Wednesday and Friday last will be now taken. N. B. The said Mock Opera is publish’d by J. Roberts in Warwick-Lane.

 

 

 

May 30

New Musick just publish’d,

[...] The Princess Anne’s Chacoone,

Mr L’Abee’s new Dance for his Majesty’s Birth-Day, 1719.

The Tune by Mr Galliard, to which is add the newest Minuits,

Riggadoons, and French Dances, perform’d at Court

and Publick Entertainments. price 6 d. Printed for John

Walsh, Servant in ordinary to his Majesty, at the Harp and

Hoboy in Catherine street in the Strand, and J. Hare at the

Viol and Flute in Cornhill near the Royal Exchange.

 

 

 

Jul 13

Paolo Antonio Rolli to Abbate Giuseppe Riva

Thistleworth il 13, di luglio 1719

La Denys alias Sciarpina à già cantato due volte dalla Prencipessa: s’ajuta La barca. L’uomo ama e dissimola: ma quousque tandem?

La Zanzara castratina è fermata con i Castrucci e Pippo a servir due volte la settimana, questa ottima Prencipessa per tutta la stagione. Sandoni suona il Cembalo, è molto gradito sara premiato ancor’egli, e godo della sua introduzzione: Farà bene a se stesso per far bene alla creatura. Attilio è ritornato in Città: una lite li à cacciati [sic] dalla casa di campagna la quale sta in pendenza.

Thistleworth, 13th July, 1719.

La Denys, alias Sciarpina, has already sung twice before the Princess [Caroline]. La Parca assists her. The Man [“l’Uomo”] loves and dissimulates, but how long is this to last?

La Zanzara Castratina has agreed with Castrucci and Pippo to appear before this excellent Princess twice a week. Sandoni plays the harpsichord, and is much approved. He also will be rewarded, and I am very glad that he had been introduced to Court. Attilio has returned to Town. A lawsuit has driven him from home.

 

 

 

Jul 15/26

Handel to the Earl of Burlington

My Lord

C’est toujours autant par une vive reconnoissance, que par devoir, que je me donne l’honneur de Vous dire le zele et l’attachement que j’ay pour Vôtre personne. Je Vous dois de plus un Conte exact de ce que j’ay entrepris, et de la reussite du sujet de mon long voyage.

Je suis icy à attendre que les engagements de Sinesino, Berselli, et Guizzardi, soyent finis, et que ces Messieurs d’ailleurs bien disposés, s’engagent avec moy pour la Grande Bretagne. tout sera decidé en quelques jours; j’ay des bonnes esperances, et dés que j’auray conclû quelque chose de réel, je Vous l’ecrirai My Lord,

comme a mon bienfaiteur, à mon Protecteur. Conservez moy, My Lord, Vos graces, elles me seront pretieuses, et ce sera toujours avec ardeur et fidelité que je suivray Vôtre service, et Vôs nobles volontés. C’est avec une soumission egalement sincere et profonde que je serai à jamais.

My Lord

Vôtre

tres humble tres obeissant, et tres devoue

Serviteur

à Dresde

ce 26/15 de Juillet

1719

 

GEORGE FRIDERIC HANDEL

My Lord,

            It is always as much with deep gratitude as in duty bound that I have the honour to assure you of my zeal and devotion towards your person. I further owe you an exact account of what I have undertaken and of the successful outcome of my long voyage.

            I am waiting here for the engagements of Sinesino, Berselli and Guizzardi to be concluded and for these gentleman (who are, I may add, favourably disposed) to sign contracts with me for Great Britain. Everything will be decided in a few days’ time; I have good hopes, and as soon as I have concluded something definite, I shall inform you of it, My Lord, as my benefactor and patron. Pray continue, My Lord, your favours; they will be precious to me, and I shall always exert myself in your service to carry out your commands with zeal and fidelity.

I remain always, My Lord, with sincere and profound submission,

Your

most humble, obedient and devoted

servant,

George Frideric Handel

Dresden, 26th/15th July 1719.

 

 

 

Jul 27

The Royal Accademy of Musick Charter

 

George by the Grace of God &c To all to whom these presents shall come Greeting know

yee that wee of our especial Grace certain knowledge and meer mocon have granted

Ordained Constituted and Declared and by these presents for us our heires and Successors

Do Grant Ordaine Constitute and Declare That our Right Trusty and Right Entirely

beloved Cousin and Counsellour Henry Duke of Kent Keeper of our

Privy Seal our Right Trusty and Right Entirely Beloved Cousin and

Counsellour Thomas Holles Duke of Newcastle our Chamberlain of our houshold for the

time being our Right Trusty and Right Entirely beloved Cousin Charles Duke of Grafton

our Right Trusty and Right Entirely beloved Cousin Henry Duke of Portland our Right

Trusty and Right Entirely beloved Cousin James Duke of Montrose our Right Trusty and

Right Entirely beloved Cousin Charles Duke of Manchester our Right Trusty and Right

Entirely beloved Cousin James Duke of Chandos our Right Trusty and Right Welbeloved

Cousin and Counsellour Charles Earl of Sunderland and our Right Trusty and Right

Welbeloved Cousin Henry Earl of Rochester our Right Trusty and Right Welbeloved

Cousin and Counsellour James Earl of Berkeley our Right Trusty and Right Welbeloved

Cousin Richard Earl of Burlington our Right Trusty and Right Welbeloved Cousin George {51}

Earl of Litchfield our Right Trusty and Right Welbeloved Cousin Henry Earl of Lincoln

our Right Trusty and Right Welbeloved Cousin Thomas Earl of Stafford our Right Trusty

and Right Welbeloved Cousin George Earl of Halifax our Right Trusty and Right

Welbeloved Cousin Henry Earl of Thomond our Right Trusty and Right Welbeloved

Cousin Talbot Earl of Sussex our Right Trusty and Right Welbeloved Cousin and

Counsellour William Earl of Cadogan our Right Trusty and Right Welbeloved Cousin

David Earl of Portmore our Right Trusty and Right Welbeloved Cousin Henry Earl of

Montroth our Right Trusty and Welbeloved Cousin Henry Viscount Lonsdale our Right

Trusty and Welbeloved Cousin Richard Viscount Castlemaine our Right Trusty and

Welbeloved Cousin James Viscount Limerick our Right Trusty and Welbeloved John Lord

Gower our Right Trusty and Welbeloved Allen Lord Bathurst our Right Trusty and

Welbeloved Robert Lord Bingley Our Right Trusty and Welbeloved George Lord

Lansdowne our Right Trusty and Welbeloved Henry Lord Carleton our Right Trusty and

Welbeloved Charles Powlet Esquire comonly called Marquis of Winchester our Trusty and

Welbeloved Walter Lord Chetwynd our Right Trusty and Welbeloved Counsellour James

Craggs one of our Principal Secretaries of State our Trusty and Welbeloved Counsellour

Richard Hampden Esquire our Trusty and Welbeloved Sir Hungerford Hoskins Sir

Mathew Decker Sir John Guise and Sir Wilfred Lawson Baronets our Trusty and

Welbeloved Sir John Jennings Sir George Coke and Sir Humphry Howarth Knights our

Trusty and Welbeloved Thomas Coke Vice Chamberlain of our Housh[old] William Evans

Roger Jones James Bruce William Pulteney Thomas Coke Thomas Harrison Benjamin

Mildmay Thomas Harrison George Wade ffrancis Whitworth William Chetwynd Thomas

Smith Martin Bladin Thomas Gage ffrancis Negus William Young Brian ffairfax and John

Arbuthnot Esquires and such others who shall hereafter be admitted in manner hereinafter

menconed to be subscribers to the Corporation hereby Established

shall from henceforth for and during the Term of one and Twenty

years be and be called One Body Corporate and Politick for

Carrying on Operas and other Entertainments of Musick within this our kingdom of Great

Britain in Deed and in name by the Name of the Royal Accademy of Musick and them by

the name of the Royal Accademy of Musick one Body Corporate and Politick in Deed and

in name really and fully for us our heires and Successors wee do Erect Ordain Make Create

and Constitute by these presents And that they by the same Name of The Royal Accademy

of Musick shall and may for the purposes aforesaid have Succession during the Term of one

and Twenty years from the date of these our letters Patents And that

they and their Successors by the same Name may Sue and be Sued

plead and be Impleaded Answer and be Answered Defend and be Defended in all Courts

and places and before whatsoever Judges and Justices and other Persons and Officers of us

our heires and Successors that now are or hereafter shall be within that part of our united

kingdom of Great Britain called England in all and singular Actions Pleas Suites Plaints

Causes matters and Demand[s] whatsoever and of whatsoever kind Quality nature or Sort

they be or shall be and may do and Execute all and every other Acts and things in the same

and in as ample manner and forme to all intents and purposes as any other of our Subjects

of that part of our united kingdom of Great Britain called England being persons able and

capable in Law or any other Body Corporate and Politick within that part of our united

kingdom of Great Britain called [England] may and can Sue and be Sued plead and be

Impleaded Answer and be Answered Defend and be Defended do Performe and Execute

And further wee have given and Granted And by these presents for us our heires and

Successors do Give and Grant unto the said Corporation hereby Established and their

Successors for and during the Term aforesaid full power and Authority to gather together

Entertain Govern Priviledge and keep all such Proper and fit

persons as they shall Judge necessary for the purposes aforesaid to

Exercise and Act Operas And to Exhibit all other Entertainments of Musick within any

house built or to be built where the same can be best fitted and rendred convenient and

Suitable for the purposes aforesaid and wherein Operas and all other Entertainments of

Musick whatsoever may be shewed and presented all and every which said Person and {52}

Persons so Employed kept and Entertained by the said Corporacon shall be Subject to such

Contracts Restriccons Regulations and agreements as the said Corporacon hereby Erected

and their Successors shall think meet And wee do hereby for us our heires and Successors

Grant unto the Corporacon hereby Constituted full power lycence and authority to permit

such persons at and during the pleasure of the said Corporation and their Successors from

time to time to Exercise and Act Operas and to Exhibit other Entertainments of Musick of

all sorts peaceably and quietly without the Impeachment or Impediment of any person or

persons whatsoever for the Encouragement of such who shall apply themselves to the Art of

Musick and the honest Recreation of such who shall desire to hear or see the same

Nevertheless under the Regulacons hereinafter menconed and such others as the said

Corporacon shall find reasonable and necessary to be Observed And that it shall and may

be lawfull to and for the said Corporation and their Successors to take and receive of such

our Subjects as shall resort to see or hear any such Operas or other

entertainments of Musick whatsoever such Sume or Sumes of money

as either have Accustomably been given and taken in the like kind or as shall be thought

reasonable by the said Corporation in regard of the great Expences of Scenes Musick and

such New Decorations as have not been formerly used Subject nevertheless to the

Regulations hereinafter mentioned And further for us our heires and Successors wee do

hereby Give and Grant unto the said Corporation hereby Constituted and their Successors

full power to make such allowances out of that which shall be received by the Acting of

Operas and Exhibiting other Entertainments of Musick as aforesaid

to the Actors and other Persons Employed in Acting Representing or

in any Quality whatsoever about the said house as the said Corporation shall think fit And

that all such Persons shall be under the Sole Government and Authority of the said

Cor[por]ation and their Successors in manner herein after

mentioned and all Scandalous and mutinous persons shall from time to

time by the said Corporation be ejected and disabled from Acting And further wee have

Given and Granted And by these presents for us our heires and Successors do give and

Grant to the said Corporation hereby Established and their Successors full power and

Authority to have use and enjoy for the Term of one and Twenty yeares from the date

hereof a Common Seal for the affaires and Business of the said Corporation which shall be

and be called the Comon Seal of the Corporation of the Royal Accademy of Musick and the

same Seal at their pleasure from time to time to break alter and make New as to the said

Corporation and their Successors shall seem best to be done And further for the due and

orderly Regulating and Government of the said Corporation hereby Erected wee do hereby

for us our heires and Successors Grant unto the same and their Successors that from

henceforth during the Term of one and Twenty yeares there shall be

a Governour a Deputy Governour and ffifteen Directors at the least

but the same not to Exceed the Number of Twenty of which five

shall be a Quorum who shall be Members of the said Corporacon and be called Directors of

the said Corporacon of the Royal Accademy of Musick which said Governor Deputy

Governor and any five or more of the said Directors shall be a Court of Directors of the said

Corporacon And that the Lord Chamberlain of our houshold for the

time being shall be always Governor of the said Corporation And

that the first Deputy Governour and Directors be Chosen out of the Members of the said

Corporation by Majority of votes of the Members of the said

Corporation by Balloting within one kallendar Month from the date

of these our letters Patents at such convenient place as the Governor shall appoint for that

purpose And who being so Chosen shall continue in their respective Offices till the Two

and Twentieth of November next following the date of these presents or till other Deputy

Governor and Directors are Chosen in their Room and that all and every future Deputy

Governor and Directors be in like manner and at such place Chosen on the Two and

Twentieth day of November or within fourteen days after To continue in their respective

Offices for one whole year or untill others shall be Elected in their Room And in case of

Death Avoidance or Removal of the Deputy Governour or of any of

the Directors of the said Corporacon for the time being the Survivors

of them or the Majority of those remaining in their said Office of Directors may at any time {53}

with the Consent of the Governor Assemble together the Members of the said Corporacon

in Order to Elect other Persons in the Room of those then dead removed or Avoided

respectively And all and every Person and Persons so Chosen in any of the Cases aforesaid

shall be admitted to be Deputy Governor Director or Directors respectively of the said

Corporation And wee do hereby will Ordain and appoint that all and every person or

Persons shall be and be Esteemed Qualified and Capable to be an Elector to vote and shall

or may give a vote for an Election of the Deputy Governor or the Directors or any of them

for or concerning the making of By laws or any other matters relating to the affaires or

Government of the said Corporation who shall at the time of such his voting have in his or

her Name and Right the Sume of Two hundred pounds or more

Share or Interest in the Capital Stock of the said Corporation and

not otherwise and that all and every person or persons shall be capable of giving in any of

the Cases aforesaid two votes who shall at the time of such his voting have in his or her

Name and Right six hundred pounds or more Share or Interest in the said Capital Stock

and not otherwise And wee do hereby for us our heires and Successors Give and Grant to

the said Corporation and their Successors full power and Authority to receive and take

subscriptions from any person or Persons whatsoever who shall

tender themselves and be willing to become Members of the said

Corporation any Sume or Sumes of Money so as the same be not less than the Sume of Two

hundred pounds for each Person And every person so Subscribing and paying in the same

or so much thereof as shall be required by the said Corporation into the Capital Stock of the

said Corporation shall thereupon be Admitted to be a Member of the said Corporation and

shall be capable of voting and acting as such in manner herein declared And wee do declare

that all Sums of money which shall be Subscribed in pursuance of these our letters Patents

together with all Bounties which from time to time by any person whatsoever shall be given

or Granted to or to the use or benefit of the said Corporation shall be the Joynt Stock of the

said Corporation for the purposes hereby intended And further wee do for us our heires and

Successors Give and Grant unto the said Corporacon hereby Constituted and their

Successors full power and Authority to hold a Generall Court once

in three Months or oftner if the Governour shall think fit at such

convenient place as he shall appoint for that purpose And that the Members of the said

Corporation or the Major part of such of them as shall be as aforesaid Assembled in a

Generall Court of the said Corporation (publick and timely Notice being first given to such

of the Members of the said Corporation tor the time being who shall be then resident within

the Cities of London and Westminster or [the suburbs and environs] thereof holding and

keeping every such General Court) shall and may according to their sound discretions

Conferr Consult and advise of all matters and things whatsoever touching or concerning

the said Corporation and the good Rule and Government of the same and the Members

thereof And shall and may also by Plurality of votes at such General Court make Constitute

Ordain and Establish from time to time in writing By laws Rules Regulations Ordinances

Orders and Constitucons whatsoever being reasonable and not repugnant to the Laws of

our Realm nor against the Publick and Comon good of the said Corporation Provided

Neverthelesse and our express will and pleasure is that at and in the said General Court

and in the Court of Directors herein Constituted and elsewhere the Governor shall always

have a Negative vote in all matters whatsoever relating to the said

Corporation And that no such Bylaws Rules Regulacons

Ordinances Orders and Constitucons as aforesaid to be made and Establish[ed] shall be valid or

binding without his Consent or approbation And that if the said Corporation shall at any

time hereafter refuse to obey any Orders from the Governor signified to them in writing for

that purpose they shall forfeit the Bounty which now is or may at

any time hereafter be Granted them by us our heires or Successors

And our will and pleasure is That a Court of Directors of the said Corporation be held once

in each kalendar Month or oftner as the Governor shall think fit at such Convenient place {54}

as he shall appoint for that purpose to Consult about the affairs and management of the

said Corporation And in the absence of the Governor the Deputy Governor and Directors

by majority of votes shall Choose a Chairman for that Meeting To which said Court of

Directors wee do hereby for us our heires and Successors give full power and Authority

from time to time as occasion shall [require] to call upon the Subcribers for any Sume of

Money out of their respective Subscriptions And if any person shall

Neglect or Refuse to Answer such call within the time appointed for

that purpose Our will and pleasure is that such Person so Neglecting or Refusing shall

thenceforth fforfeit his share in the said Capital Stock of the said Corporacon and Cease to

be a Member thereof Reserving always to us our heires and Successors during the Term

hereby Granted full power and Authority by any future letters Patents under the Great Seal

of Great Britain from time to time to Explain Alter Enlarge or Amend all or any of the

Powers and Authorities herein before Granted or mentioned to be granted lastly wee will

and by these presents for us our heires and Successors do Grant unto the Corporation

hereby Constituted and their Successors That these our letters Patents or the inrollment

thereof shall be and remain from time to time good firm valid and effectual in the law

according to the true intent and meaning thereof in all things and shall be taken construed

and Expounded in the most favourable and beneficial Sense for the best advantage of the

said Corporation and their Successors Notwithstand[ing] any Defect uncertainty omission

or Imperfeccon in these our letters Patents or any other matter cause or thing whatsoever to

the contrary thereof in any wise notwithstanding In witnesse [whereof we have caused

these our letters to be made patent] witnesse William Archbishop of Canterbury [& the

rest of the guardians & justices of the kingdom] at Westminster the twenty seventh day of

July [in the fifth year of our reign]                                                     By writt of Privy Seal

[Cocks]

 

 

 

August

Paolo Rolli in Richmond to Giuseppe Riva in Hanover, August 1719

 

{…} the jealous fits of [La Denys, alias] Sciarpinetta are fun to observe.  La Devinport is rather ugly {...}, with a nose like a jug {...}, and she takes snuff {...} like a grenadier.  But the man (?perhaps Sandoni or Handel) is often alone with her {...}.  I suppose that Sciapinetta, with her dagger-shooting eyes, is shaken {...}.  I confess that I have been diverted.

 

 

 

August 1719

 

Paolo Antonio Rolli to Giuseppe Riva

Richmond il non so quanti d’Agosto 1719

È stato in Londra D. Filippo Juvara quel bravo Architetto siculo che facea le belle scene d’Ottoboni in cancelleria a Roma; egli è ai servizio del Re dell’Alpi e venia da Portugallo dove fu dal suo Re mandato a quell’altro Re per la direzzione d’un Palazzo e d’una Catedrale: fu rubato di molta somma, mentre andava a spasso presso all’alto Barco nel Coppê con l’Inviato portughese. ma che importa: è stato pensionato da quel Re di m.[ille] scudi annui, e fatto Cavaliero del su’ordine: oltra la pago, del suo Padrone.

            Castrucci seniore sta molto male con febre terzana doppia. mylord Burlington partì per Italia. si da per accertato che La Durastanti verrà per l’opere: oh che mala scelta per l’Inghilterra! non entro nel di Lei cantare, ma è un’Elefante. Si dice ancora che Borosini e non Guicciardi sia il Tenore che viene. L’Eiddeggherone à dormito due notti nel V.ro letto: cantò i duetti dello Stefani dalla Principessa: vinse la sera dugento ghinee a Bannister, e ne perdè co’l medesimo 240.

la mattina.

Richmond, I don’t know which day of August 1719.

Castrucci Senior is very ill with malarial fever. Mylord Burlington has left for Italy. It is said for certain that Durastanti will be coming for the Operas: Oh! what a bad choice for England! I shall not enter into her singing merits but she really is an Elephant! They are still saying that Borosini is the tenor coming and not Guicciardi! Big old Eiddegher has slept two nights in your bed: he sang Stefani’s duets at the Princess’s: he won 200 Guineas from Bannister in the evening and lost 240 to the same, in the morning.…

Yours

Rolli.

 

 

 

 

Oct 6

The Lord Chamberlain of His Majesty’s Houshold does hereby give Notice, that on Friday the 6th of November, at Ten in the Morning, there will be a General Court of the Patentees of the Royal Academy of Musick, held at the Opera-House in the Hay-Market, to consult about the Affairs of the said Company, of which every Subscriber is desired to take Notice.

 

 

 

Nov 6 NS

Field-Marshal Count Jacob Heinrich Flemming to Petronilla Melusina von der Schulenburg

A Madsl. de Schulenburg

Dresden, le 6o.XI: 1719

Mdsl.

… J’ay souhaitté de parler a M. Hendel, et luy ay voulu faire quelques honettetér a votre egard, mais il n’y a pas eu moyen; Je me suis servi de votre nom pour le faire venir chèr [chez?] moy, mais tantot il néstoit pas au logis tantot il étoit malade; Il est un peu fol [ursprüngliche Wendung: Il est fier] a ce qu’il me semble, ce que cependant il ne devroit pas être a mon egard, vu que je suis musicien c. a d. par inclination, et que je fais gloire d’etre un des plus – fideles serviteurs de vous, Madsl., que étes la plus aimable de ses ecolieres; Jay voulu vous dire tout cecy pour quâ votre tour vous puissiez donner les leçons a votre maitre; J’ay l’honneur d’ètre –

 

 

 

… I hoped to see Mr. Hendel and intended to speak to him in laudatory terms of you, but there was no opportunity. I made use of your name to persuade him to call on me, but either he was not at his lodgings or else he was ill. It seems to me that he is a little mad; however he should not behave to me in that way, as I am a musician [too] —that is, by inclination—and flatter myself on being, Mademoiselle, one of your most devoted servants, as you are the most charming of his pupils. I wished to tell you all this so that you in your turn may give your master a hint or two.

 

 

 

Nov 7

The Lord Chamberlain of His Majesty’s Houshold does hereby give Notice, that on Wednesday the 18th Instant, at Twelve a-Clock, will be held a General Court of the Patentees of the Royal Academy of Musick, at the Opera-House in the Hay-Market, to chuse Directors; which every Subscriber is desired to take Notice of; and that Printed Lists of the Subscribers will be delivered at White’s Chocolate-House on the 11th Instant.

 

 

 

Nov 21

The Lord Chamberlain of His Majesty’s Houshold, Governour of the Royal Academy of Musick, does hereby give Notice, That on Wednesday the 25th Instant, at Eleven a-Clock in the Forenoon, will be held a General Court at the Opera-House in the Hay Market, to chuse a Deputy-Governour, and to consult about the Affairs of the said Company.

 

 

 

Nov 27

Minutes of the Royal Academy of Music

 

27 Novr 1719

At a Court of the Royal Academy of Musick

Present: Governour, Deputy Governour, Directors: Duke of Montague, Duke of Portland, Lord Bingley, Mr. Bruce, Mr. Mildmay, Mr. Fairfax, Mr. Blathwayte, Mr. [George] Harrison, Mr. Smith, Mr. Whitworth, Doctor Arbuthnot, Mr. Heidegger.

 

Ordered

            That a Letter be writ to Mr Hendell to make an Offer to Durastante of Five hundred pounds Sterling for three months to commence from the first day of March next or Sooner if possible, And that in Case she continues here the remainder of fifteen months, Eleven hundred pounds more, if not, One hundred pounds to bear her expences home.

            That Mr Hendell be Ord’red to retum to England & bring with him Grunswald the Bass upon the terms he proposes – And that he bring with him the proposalls of all the Singers he has treated with, particularly Cajetano Orsini.

 

 

 

Nov 30

Minutes of the Royal Academy of Music

 

Ord’red

… That Mr Heidegger be also desir’d to speak to Seignr Riva to write to Seignr Senezino to engage him to be here in October next, to Stay till the End of May on the most reasonable terms he can get him, And in his Offer to mencon pounds Sterling & not Guineas, & to make his Offer for two Years in case he finds him more reasonable, proporconable for two Years, than One, And that Security shall be given him by any Merchant he desires.

            It is the Opinion of the Board of Directors … that Mr Hendell be Mar of the Orchestra with a Sallary.

… that Seignr Bona Cini be writ to, to know his Terms for composing & performing in the Orchestra.

 

 

 

Nov 30

Several Motions being made for Leave for ye persons following to Subscribe to ye Royal

Academy vizt Duke of Wharton (recommended bye Mr Heidegger), Lord Percivale

(Mr Whitworth), Sir Robert Childe (Duke of Manchester), Sir John Eyles (Ditto), Mr

Burnett (Mr Harrison), Cha: Whitworth Esqr. (Mr Whitworth), Major Boyle Smith

(Mr Heidegger), Sir Thomas Samuel (Mr Blathwayte).  Leave was granted Accordingly.

 

 

 

Dec 2

A motion being made by Mr Whitworth that Sir William Gordon & John Proby Esqr.

have Leave to Subscribe Leave was given accordingly.

 

 

 

Dec 2

Minutes of the Royal Academy of Music

 

            … That Mr Heidegger be desir’d to propose to Seignr Portou the composing of an Opera.

            … That Mr Pope be desir’d to propose a Seal with a Suitable Motto to it, for the Royal Academy of Musick,

            And Doctor Arbuthnot be desir’d to acquaint him therewith.

 

 

 

Dec 8

The Directors of the Royal Academy of Musick, by virtue of a Power given them under the King’s Letters Patents, having thought it necessary to make a Call of 5 l. per Cent. from each Subscriber, have authorized the Treasurer to the said Royal Academy, or his Deputy, to receive the same, and to give Receipts from each Sum so paid in; this is therefore to desire the Subscribers to pay, or cause to be paid, the said five per Cent. according to the several Subscriptions, on the 18th or 19th Instant, at the Opera-House in the Hay-Market; where Attendance will be given by the Deputy-Treasurer from Nine till One in the Forenoon, who will give Receipts for every Sum so paid by each Subscriber as aforesaid.

 

 

 

Dec 15

The Governour and Court of Directors of the Royal Academy of Musick do hereby give Notice, that there will be a General Court held on Monday the 18th of January next, at Eleven in the Forenoon, at the Opera Hause in the Hay-Market; of which every Subscriber to the said Royal Academy is desired to take Notice.

 

 

 

The Solemn LOVER.  A New SONG, made to entertain the Persons of Quality, and other my Friends at my Play.  The Words made to a pretty Minuet, Compos’d by Mr. Hendell.

[…]

 

 

 

The Noblest Works of Rafaelle, the most Ravishing Musick of Hendell, the most Masterly Strokes of Milton, touch not People without Discernment: So the Beauties of the Works of the great Author of Nature are not seen but by Enlighten’d Eyes, […]

 

 

 

1719

Johann Mattheson

Exemplarische Organistenprobe, Harnburg 1719

 

Ja, was sage ich vom F mol? so gar der bekandte und tägliche C mol weichet gar offt ins A, als seine Sextam, aus. Zum Beweis dessen kan eine Cantata von Msr. Händeln, die mir eben zur Hand lieget, dienen. Sie ist zwar nicht gedruckt, (wie ich denn nicht weiß, daß von diesem so berühmten Autore was gedrucktes oder gravirtes vorhanden, welches mich wundert) allein sie ist in vieler Leute Händen, und führet den Titul: Lucretia. Die Anfangs-Worte heissen: O Numi eterni etc. und die andere Aria hat gleich beym Anfang des zweyten Theils diesen Satz: Se il passo move, – – – se il guardo gira, – – –, &c.

Darinnen ist der gantze Ambitus des Modi Gis dur, oder bA, enthalten, und wer denselben nicht als einen eigenen Modum kennet, ist auch incapable, diese anderthalb Zeilen recht zu spielen.

Exemplary Test for Organists

 

… Well, what shall I say of F minor? Even the well-known and everyday C minor modulates very often to Ab, as its sixth. As proof of this a Cantata by Msr. Händel, which lies just to hand, can serve. It is indeed not printed (incidentally, I do not know of anything by this most famous author, which has been printed or engraved, —and this surprises me) but is in many people‘s hands, and carries the title: Lucretia. The opening words are: O Numi eterni &c. and the following Aria has, at the very beginning of the second part, this sentence:

[Se il passo move, se il guardo gira.]

In this the whole Ambitus is contained in the key of G# major, or Ab, and anyone who does not know these as one and the same key is also incapable of playing these one and a half staves correctly.